The charm and appeal of a well-maintained garden can significantly enhance the value of a property. However, not all garden features are created equal. Some may inadvertently detract from the overall value of your home. Understanding which elements to avoid or modify can help maintain, if not boost, your home’s market appeal. Here are five garden features that might devalue a home.

1. Overly Personalised Landscaping

The Issue

While a garden should reflect your taste, overly personalised landscaping can be a deterrent to potential buyers. Features such as elaborate statues, themed garden sections, or highly specific plant choices may not appeal to everyone.

The Impact

Potential buyers may see these personalised touches as additional work or expense to remove and replace with something more to their liking. This can make the property less attractive and lead to lower offers.

What to Do Instead

Opt for neutral, versatile landscaping that provides a blank canvas for future owners. Simple, well-maintained lawns, standard flower beds, and a few tasteful decorative elements often strike the right balance.

2. Excessive Hardscaping

The Issue

Hardscaping elements like patios, decks, retaining walls, and pathways can add structure to a garden, but too much can overwhelm the natural beauty of the space.

The Impact

An overabundance of hardscape features can make the garden feel cramped and reduce green space, which many buyers cherish. Moreover, some hardscape elements require substantial maintenance and can be costly to alter or remove.

What to Do Instead

Balance hardscaping with ample greenery. Use hardscape features to enhance the functionality and flow of the garden, but ensure they complement rather than dominate the space.

3. High-Maintenance Gardens

The Issue

Gardens that require frequent, intensive upkeep can be a significant turn-off for potential buyers, especially those without a green thumb or the time to maintain an elaborate garden.

The Impact

High-maintenance gardens might be seen as a burden, leading buyers to either negotiate down the price to account for future upkeep costs or look elsewhere.

What to Do Instead

Design low-maintenance gardens using hardy, drought-resistant plants, automated watering systems, and minimal weeding landscapes. This approach appeals to a broader range of buyers looking for beauty without the extensive upkeep.

4. Water Features

The Issue

Water features such as ponds, fountains, or pools can be visually appealing but come with their own set of challenges, including maintenance, safety concerns, and potential legal liabilities.

The Impact

While some buyers see water features as luxurious additions, others may view them as high-maintenance and risk-prone. Families with young children, in particular, might see ponds or pools as hazards, making the property less appealing.

What to Do Instead

If you have a water feature, ensure it’s well-maintained and safe. Consider adding safety features like covers or fencing if applicable. For those planning to add water features, weigh the benefits against potential buyer concerns and opt for simpler, safer water elements.

5. Artificial Grass

The Issue

Artificial grass has gained popularity due to its low maintenance and year-round lush appearance, but it can sometimes be viewed unfavourably.

The Impact

Potential buyers might perceive artificial grass as unattractive or environmentally unfriendly. Natural grass is often preferred for its aesthetic and ecological benefits, and some buyers may anticipate the cost of replacing artificial turf with real grass.

What to Do Instead

If you choose artificial grass, opt for high-quality products that closely mimic natural grass. Ensure proper installation and maintenance to avoid issues like heat retention and odour. Highlighting the benefits, such as lower water usage and minimal upkeep, can also help mitigate potential buyer concerns.

Conclusion

When it comes to enhancing your garden, it’s crucial to strike a balance between personal enjoyment and market appeal. By avoiding overly personalised landscaping, excessive hardscaping, high-maintenance features, risky water elements, and potentially divisive artificial grass, you can keep your garden an asset rather than a liability.

Thinking of selling soon? Consider a garden makeover that prioritises versatility, low maintenance, and broad appeal. This strategic approach ensures your garden enhances, rather than detracts from, your home’s value. Remember, a beautiful garden can be one of your property’s most significant selling points when done right.